Jane Calling: Darcy and Liz Senselessly in Love

Today is the 200th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice, which is why I am writing about Sense and Sensibility.  Everyone will be extolling their la-de-dahs about P&P, so I’m writing about the forgotten firstie: Sense and Sensibility.

In my last post, I created a poll to see what you all thought about which book is better: Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility.  Here are the results

I also said I would start my finally-free-from-finals weekend with a Sense and Sensibility marathon.  I began with Emma Thompson’s 1995 film adaptation.  apparently there hadn’t been an major film adaptation of a JA novel for fifty years until Ang Lee and Emma brought their version to the screen (although there had been a few TV ones).  To say it was a hit is a definite understatement.  Here’s the Wikipedia on it (please don’t tell Mrs. Fieldstone I’m using Wikipedia as a resource):

Sense and Sensibility
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Ang Lee
Produced by Lindsay Doran
Screenplay by Emma Thompson
Based on Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Starring Emma Thompson Alan Rickman Kate Winslet Hugh Grant
Music by Patrick Doyle
Cinematography Michael Coulter
Editing by Tim Squyres
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date(s)
  • 13 December 1995 (1995-12-13) (United States)
  • 23 February 1996 (1996-02-23) (United Kingdom)
Running time 136 minutes[1]
Country United Kingdom United States
Language English French
Budget $16 million
Box office $134,993,774

Sense and Sensibility is a 1995 British-American period drama film directed by Taiwanese-American director Ang Lee and based on Jane Austen‘s 1811 novel of the same name Emma Thompson wrote the script and stars as Elinor Dashwood, while Kate Winslet plays Elinor’s sister Marianne. Actors Hugh Grant and Alan Rickman play their respective suitors.

Producer Lindsay Doran, a longtime admirer of Austen’s novel, hired Thompson to write the screenplay. The actress spent four years penning numerous revisions, working on the script between other films as well as into production of the film itself. Doran found studios nervous that Thompson was the credited writer, but Columbia Pictures eventually agreed to act as the film’s producer. Though initially intending for another actress to portray Elinor, Thompson was persuaded to undertake the part herself, despite the disparity with her character’s age.

The film garnered overwhelmingly positive reviews upon release and  received many awards and nominations, including three awards and eleven nominations at the 1995 British Academy Film Awards. The film received seven Academy Awards nominations, including Best Picture. Emma Thompson received two nominations, for Best Actress and Best Adapted Screenplay, winning the latter. As of 2012, Thompson remains the only person to have won both acting and writing awards at the Academy Awards, as she previously won the Best Actress award in 1992 for Howards End.

Sense and Sensibility contributed to a resurgence in popularity for Austen’s work, and led to many more film and television adaptations in the following years.

I adore this movie, although I get so irritated with Marianne, I want to shake her, especially how rude she is to Colonel Brandon.  Emma plays the forbearing sister part incredibly well.  I knew, as everyone else, that she was really too old to being playing Elinor, but her acting is absolutely perfect.  When Elinor lashes out at Marianne about having had to hide her hurts all those months, she still found the compassion to comfort her self-centered sister (Kate shows her own abilities in this part).

I even checked out Emma Thompson’s book about the movie, which is the screenplay and her running journal.  That’s for next postie.

Related articles

The Pride and Prejudice Bicentenary Challenge 2013

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5 responses to “Jane Calling: Darcy and Liz Senselessly in Love

  1. Pingback: Jane Calling: Some Adaptations Make No Sense (or Sensibility) | Verasimilitude

  2. Pingback: Jane Calling: Emma Makes Sense | Verasimilitude

  3. Pingback: Mean Girls Go South « cricketmuse

  4. Pingback: An Adaptation That Makes Sense (and Sensibility) | Verasimilitude

  5. Pingback: Jane’s First Novel Makes Much Sense « cricketmuse

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